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20120925
20121003
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
austerity cuts. it was the third such protest in five days. on friday the government presented a draft budget that will cut overall spending by $40 billion euros. >> a small earthquake shaking suburb west of dallas saturday. no serious damage or injuries were reported. >> and some lifers in california could go free. governor jerry brown giving the okay to a law that can release them. >> gregg: shocking numbers, u.s. airlines raked in $2 billion in baggage ties during the first half of the year. that the largest amount ever collected for a six-month period. this as a new report emerges finding passengers are facing more fees than ever before and fewer choices. how about that? anything consumers can do. ed joins us managing partner of investment firm. rise of oil prices make a corresponding rise in jet fuel and 30% of operating costs for the airlines. are the airlines trying to make up for it in other ways like the fees? >> sure. look this is great lesson in economics. it's supply and demand and competition. when there is less competition. usually the quality goes down and prices go up.
solutions, and people lost confidence that the government knew what it was doing. they let one fail, they'd bail out another one, they'd let another one fail, back and forth. what's the policy? and so i think the crisis was terribly mishandled by secretary paulson is and the others involved in it. cheryl: i will say oneover the things, william, that he did do and, frankly, i've been on the air saying i thought it was the right move, letting lehman go, almost making that example of lehman brothers, putting the banks on notice, we're not going to be downtown at the new york fed negotiating last minute deals on sunday nights to save your behinds, basically. that was a pretty bold move by paulson. you wouldn't have done that same move that he made five years ago in. >> no, i think that when you're, when you have a crisis, the first obligation the government has is to calm the crisis, do whatever it takes to calm the crisis. and that's what we did in the 1980s. i would tell you, cheryl, the 1980s was far more threatening to the financial system and the economy than this episode in 2008. we act
, there are a lot of small-government conservatives that don't think we should be spending over $2 billion a week in afghanistan, who don't think the president should have tripled down the number of troops when he had a chance to pull back and bring those troops home. a lot of conservatives believe that. i think this is a missed opportunity. >> well, and foreign policy clearly is going to be an area where mitt romney will want to make a turn in terms of the narrative of the campaign. one other issue that is now coming into the forefront is the benghazi attack and news over the weekend that the four americans including the u.s. ambassador there who were killed according to politico, romney advisers are now split over how broadly they should hit the president over his handling of that attack. and why it took so long to acknowledge that it was an act of terrorism. while some romney advisers argue they should keep their focus on the economy, politico says plans are in the works for mitt romney to deliver a major foreign policy speech shortly after wednesday's debate. what do you think of that? you th
it better early on but you do need to be careful. in some ways it's stating the obvious. government has a role. they have infrastructure, education, we all need that to perform our jobs, our start-up businesses, whatever. but, you know, is it going the next step and saying, well, you know, no matter how successful you are we're going to take some of it. that's what people were hearing. that's where the president needs to be careful. i do think that that theme did resonate. >> you could imagine, you're a person of -- a perfect person to channel this. you can imagine a very effective conservative -- republican message that was also kind of antiwall street? >> yeah. i wish we did. >> yes. exactly. >> i'm not into wall street. independent of wall street. >> the question is why has -- >> that's one of the great mysteries. i think this is where right and left should agree. i think this is not ideological. these guys are still threats to our financial system. they should stand on their own two feet. taxpayers shouldn't have to bail them out. that's a good conservative principal or progressive
meant governing right quick. but you know i go back to something i say every time, that people have to remember that, you know, thanks to two books, one by robert draper the other by michael grinwald we know between the time obama was elected president and the time he was inaugurated, republicans met at least twice, the leadership met at least twice to hatch a plan to just, you know, obstruct the incoming president no matter what. even though the economy was falling off the cliff it was all about obstruct him in 2009, to take back the house or both chambers in 2010 and win the white house in 2012. no matter what they didn't want president obama to succeed. they saw it as a success for him rather than a success for the country. >> i questiguess the question t have or quotes that will haunt him, the closing of guantanamo, comprehensive immigration reform. the problem with all that is the answer is republican stood in the way, didn't want to play ball, which you could say a fair assessment but does it sound after you have the same answer to each question, does it sound whiney? >> i thi
by the federal government but you need accountability and measurement and you point out things that are accepted and all other circles, in business, are still controversial in education and the status quo continues to be protected and as you raise expectations you're going to get pushback. what happened in chicago, governor, did the good guys win there in terms of getting accountability or did the, once again did we have to sort of fold for this status quo? >> i think at the end of the day the only measurement that matters are whether kids, students in chicago are getting a year's worth of knowledge in a year's time and at the end, the expectations are high enough, the standards are real enough that they can live an independent life. so it's hard to tell whether this agreement will yield that. i think chicago has an adult centered system completely focused on the economic interests of the adults. the whole shift needs to be about how kids can gain the power of knowledge. we're losing social mobility now. if you live in poverty the chances are you'll stay in poverty and that's shameful for a coun
. it is a lead in some of those take a look at government spending. that's where mitt romney has a very big league 58-38 percent. back to you guys. >> interesting numbers. we could keep that up there for a while. >> look whose talking is what bill clinton is talking about. talking point memo bill o'reilly discusses why like ability is so important and debates are going to be crucial for both candidates. >> there are two kinds of voters in america those who know what the issues are those who don't. for the uninformed casual voert emotion drives the decision and part of that equation is like ability. many historians belief ronald reagan defeated jimmy carter because he came across as likeable while carter was distant. same thing with clinton and the younger clinton had like ability. the younger remain personally popular until the resignificance kicked in. right now in a popularity poll president obama is ahead of mitt rom flee by 3 points according to a new fox news survey. after the debates that could change dramatically. romney and obama realize they must seem like the nice guy that's why t
that threatened to shut down the federal government, you voted to continue paying members of congress including yourself in the event of a shut down. at the same time, you voted against a bill that would have ensured that members of the armed services continued to get paid. my question is this, eric. how could you in good conscious vote to continue your own pay but at the same time vote to stop paying our servicemen and women that you voted to send into combat in afghanistan? >> cantor never directly answered the question. do you think we're doing enough for our service members, what about it? >> by not answering it, he answered it. he's never done enough for our service people. he voted against a suicide prevention program for veterans returning from iraq and afghanistan. for every combat loss we have every day, we have 18 people who came back from afghanistan and iraq that commit suicide. the veterans are forgotten in this political gamut that he has in d.c. he's intent to make sure the wealthiest get the tax cuts. he forgets that the people we send over to fight the war, they deserve the bes
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)